The Latest Technology Produces the Most Accurate Diagnoses

Retina Institute of Hawaii utilizes the most advanced diagnostic equipment available to help diagnose conditions such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, retinitis, uveitis, ocular tumors. Our cutting-edge equipment includes:

 

Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT)

The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph is a confocal laser scanning microscope for acquisition and analysis of three-dimensional images of the posterior segment.

Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT)

It enables the quantitative assessment of the retinal topography and precise follow-up of topographic changes. The most important clinical routine application of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph is the topographic description and follow-up of the glaucomatous optic nerve head.

Optos

Producing a high resolution image of up to 200 degrees, or approximately 82% of the retina, in a single capture which takes a quarter of a second.

Optos

Optos believes that its technology provides an unequalled combination of wide-field retinal imaging, speed and convenience for both the practitioner and patient.

Routine retinal examination methods provide only a limited, narrow-field view of the retina, typically less than 5% in a single capture. Such examinations can therefore miss eye and non-eye disorders or diseases, including those in the periphery of the retina, where many indicators of such diseases and precursors to eye conditions are often first exhibited. Typically, to capture a greater percentage of the retina using traditional methods, the patient’s eye must be dilated, which can cause patient discomfort, and multiple images of the retina must be taken, at additional cost and time to the practitioner.

Perimetry (MP-1)

Microperimetry, also known as fundus perimetry, is a noninvasive method by which focal areas of retinal sensitivity loss can be measured in those with macular disease.

Perimetry (MP-1)

By integrating real-time fundus imaging and computerized threshold perimetry, this system can provide fixation control by accounting for eye movement disturbances that can be common in patients with central visual loss.  As a result, this technology can provide a point-to-point correlation of the area and magnitude of retinal sensitivity loss at a precise location in the macula.